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Therapy for Therapists

It's your time on the couch.
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Frustrated Trying to Find Your Own Therapist?

You are a therapist AND a wife, mom, and daughter of aging parents.

You feel like everyone is pulling from you. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed, anxious, or depleted in this stage of life. Friends may turn to you for “free therapy,” you may be grappling with your own feelings in today’s political climate, or you might have a hard time taking off your therapist hat after work. Being a therapist is full of highs and lows, and you may struggle listening to your family’s problems after listening to clients. Psychotherapy can be an isolating profession, and emotional burnout is common.

You may feel like you shouldn’t need help.

After all, you’re a therapist so have the tools and insight to be on top of your own stuff, right? We know it’s not that easy, though. Just because we are therapists doesn’t mean we don’t have our own anxieties or struggle in our own relationships. It’s easy to feel like an imposter when others look to us as an expert. But we are human. Being a therapist doesn’t mean we don’t have problems just like everyone else. Sometimes we need support too, and that’s okay.

If a personal issue arises, you might think you can (or should be able to) handle it yourself.

Being a therapist is your calling, but what happens when you need support? It is hard to find a therapist as a therapist. You may feel like you shouldn’t need help. You are a therapist so think you should be able to help yourself. You may feel that another therapist won’t be “good enough.” You already have the professional training plus insight into your own issues… so how could someone else help?

Personal therapy for therapists is a good thing.

We must first put on our own oxygen mask before we can sustainably help others. Being a therapist is a gratifying yet taxing career, and personal therapy can relieve stress and minimize burnout. Spending some time on the couch also helps us become better practitioners. Therapists who seek therapy become more attuned to the client’s experience. As therapists we must stay vigilant in separating a client’s issues from our own, and we raise the bar of our profession by ensuring our own emotional health. Self-care allows us to best serve our clients, our families, and ourselves. You give so much to others. Now it’s time to give to yourself.

Let yourself be supported.

Claim your time on the couch.

The Therapist's Therapist

Being a therapist is your calling, but what happens when you need support?